Content © 2012-2017 by American IronHorse Owners Organization.  Use of AIH Logo Licensed by American Ironhorse, LLC
NOTE:   Technical Information content is intended to help fellow members and is not here to be copied and sold.
Two-Up Seat - Making Your Own
by “Joey Johnson”
Part 1
Part 2
Download the PDFs
Part 1
Part 2
After searching for weeks and checking prices on custom seats, I decided to attempt making my own 2-Up seat. I found several sites with the same concept of making a seat pan, so I took what other people have done and modified it slightly. This seat pan  is on my '03 Outlaw, but the process can be used for any bike. I've documented the process and found it quite easy to do. Here  you go...
1)  Using Blue 3M Painters tape, I covered the entire rear of the bike and the tail of the gas tank to keep fiberglass resin off of any part exposed close to the work area.  I added the  steel bar and Pop-riveted an aluminum Backbone for strength on the 90 deg bend. I also  added a “T” on the tail end of the aluminum later for strength where my suction cups mount.
2)  Cover the seat pan area with Aluminum Duct Tape (any hardware store should have this). Also, I covered the entire battery area with cardboard before putting down the aluminum tape.  This picture also shows how I wrapped the bike in a plastic drop cloth for extra protection. Seen here, I put about 8 coats of Carnuba wax on the aluminum tape as a release agent. Note: You can almost see the slit I cut in the aluminum tape/cardboard for my metal tab to slide through the loop on the frame to hold the front edge of the seat. See red circle.
3)  Pre-cut fiberglass to rough shape. I also added some fiberglass rope for extra strength at the bend. I bought a fire place door seal from my local hardware store – fiberglass rope…
4)  After Wax and pre-cutting, I was ready to start the glass. I picked up a fiberglass repair kit from my local auto parts store, and used 2 different kinds of fiberglass material. I put down a layer of woven cloth , and a second layer of matte. The matte is supposed to be several times stronger than the cloth. I then put in my metal backbone, and put down another layer of matte and another layer of woven cloth on top. Notice too, I predrilled my aluminum for the suction cups. (Suction cups - $2.00 for a 4 pack at local hardware store)
5)  After allowing the fiberglass to cure (about 6-8 hours) I marked the rough shape of the seat pan and pulled it off the bike.
6)  Using a rotary tool with a standard cut-off wheel, I cut the shape of the seat pan and laid it back on the bike to check fit. Don’t take too much off initially. Trim a little at a time until you are satisfied.
7)  Run a drill through the suction cup holes to clear out the fiberglass.
8) I used inexpensive automotive carpet (about $10) from the local auto parts store, and using spray contact cement, I glued it to the bottom of the seat pan.
After the fact – I added a piece of sheet metal on the tail to add strength. The seat cover will be pop riveted to the pan since it is too hard to staple. I would have laid this in between the fiberglass had I thought about it prior. Oh well – live and learn…
The finished seat pan is at the upholstery shop awaiting it’s turn to be covered. The shop has seat foam in stock, but I did order a gel pad to inlay the foam with. I will post pics of the finished product.
Part 2 - Covering the Seat Pan
After a couple of months of waiting on material – and getting the time to do it, here is the finishing process for the new 2-Up seat pan.
Here, we have traced a template for the seat foam, and added a 1” gel pad.
After a few trial fits on the bike and adjustments made, we had a pretty close fit for the finished product.
Here is the factory seat beside the new seat unfinished.
Next – we made a pattern from old material so as not to mess up the good material. I chose stingray skins again, since that’s kind of the theme of the bike.
We pop-riveted the cover to the pan – fiberglass is too hard for staples…
One final note: I covered the entire bottom with thin auto carpet to protect the paint from rivets. The rest is history!
Part 1 - Making the Seat Pan
Hope this helps someone out. I found custom made 2-up seats are quite expensive. I have around $80 - $100 in this seat so far plus $65 for the gel pad (which is enough to do the whole seat). The upholstery work will vary from shop to shop on price and material. I do have an excellent upholsterer who works quite inexpensively. If you are interested, contact me and I will get you in touch with him.
ORGANIZATION ORGANIZATION OWNERS OWNERS For All American Ironhorse Motorcycle Owners
Seat Pan
© 2012-2017   American IronHorse Owners Organization Use of AIH Logo Licensed by American Ironhorse, LLC 
Two-Up Seat - Making Your Own
by “Joey Johnson”
Part 1
Part 2
Download the PDFs
Part 1
Part 2
NOTE:   Technical Information content is intended to help fellow members and is not here to be copied and sold.
After searching for weeks and checking prices on custom  seats, I decided to attempt making my own 2-Up seat. I found several sites with the same concept of making a seat pan, so I  took what other people have done and modified it slightly. This seat pan is on my '03 Outlaw, but the process can be used for any bike. I've documented the process and found it quite easy  to do. Here you go...
Part 1 - Making the Seat Pan
1)  Using Blue 3M Painters tape, I covered the entire rear of the  bike and the tail of the gas tank to keep fiberglass resin off of  any part exposed close to the work area.  I added the steel bar  and Pop-riveted an aluminum Backbone for strength on the  90 deg bend. I also added a “T” on the tail end of the  aluminum later for strength where my suction cups mount.
2)  Cover the seat pan area with Aluminum Duct Tape (any  hardware store should have this). Also, I covered the entire battery area with cardboard before  putting down the aluminum tape. This picture also shows how I wrapped the bike in a plastic drop cloth for extra protection. Seen here, I put about 8 coats of Carnuba wax on the aluminum  tape as a release agent. Note: You can almost see the slit I cut in the aluminum tape/cardboard for my metal tab to slide through the loop on the frame to hold the front edge of the seat. See red circle.
3)  Pre-cut fiberglass to rough shape. I also added some fiberglass rope for extra strength at the bend. I bought a fire place door seal from my local hardware store – fiberglass rope…
4)  After Wax and pre-cutting, I was ready to start the glass. I picked up a fiberglass repair kit from my local auto parts store, and used 2 different kinds of fiberglass material. I put down a layer of woven cloth , and a second layer of matte. The matte is supposed to be several times stronger than the cloth. I then put in my metal backbone, and put down another layer of matte and another layer of woven cloth on top. Notice too, I predrilled my aluminum for the suction cups. (Suction cups - $2.00 for a 4 pack at local hardware store)
5)  After allowing the fiberglass to cure (about 6-8 hours) I marked the rough shape of the seat pan and pulled it off the bike.
6)  Using a rotary tool with a standard cut-off wheel, I cut the shape of the seat pan and laid it back on the bike to check fit. Don’t take too much off initially. Trim a little at a time until you are satisfied.
7)  Run a drill through the suction cup holes to clear out the fiberglass.
8) I used inexpensive automotive carpet (about $10) from the local auto parts store, and using spray contact cement, I glued it to the bottom of the seat pan.
After the fact – I added a piece of sheet metal on the tail to add strength. The seat cover will be pop riveted to the pan since it is too hard to staple. I would have laid this in between the fiberglass had I thought about it prior. Oh well – live and learn…
The finished seat pan is at the upholstery shop awaiting it’s turn to be covered. The shop has seat foam in stock, but I did order a gel pad to inlay the foam with. I will post pics of the finished product.
Hope this helps someone out. I found custom made 2-up seats are quite expensive. I have around $80 - $100 in this seat so far plus $65 for the gel pad (which is enough to do the whole seat). The upholstery work will vary from shop to shop on price and material. I do have an excellent upholsterer who works quite inexpensively. If you are interested, contact me and I will get you in touch with him.
Part 2 - Covering the Seat Pan
After a couple of months of waiting on material – and getting the time to do it, here is the finishing process for the new 2-Up seat pan.
Here, we have traced a template for the seat foam, and added a 1” gel pad.
After a few trial fits on the bike and adjustments made, we had a pretty close fit for the finished product.
Here is the factory seat beside the new seat unfinished.
Next – we made a pattern from old material so as not to mess up the good material. I chose stingray skins again, since that’s kind of the theme of the bike.
We pop-riveted the cover to the pan – fiberglass is too hard for staples…
One final note: I covered the entire bottom with thin auto carpet to protect the paint from rivets. The rest is history!
ORGANIZATION ORGANIZATION OWNERS OWNERS
Seat Pan