Content © 2012-2017 by American IronHorse Owners Organization.  Use of AIH Logo Licensed by American Ironhorse, LLC
This is a very detailed report designed to help the individual who thinks they can’t do this, or is a bit nervous about tackling a job like this. It can be done by you provided you take a lot of photos, make a lot of notes, and sketch things for clarification. Between this document and your personal documentation – YOU CAN DO THIS !! Compression Release Data from the REMOVED Compression Releases – Deltrol Controls 57261-61 MED 16X2 PULSE 12 VDC 51 Watts (3.4 Amps draw as MEASURED using a bench power supply set to 12.6VDC and a Digital Volt/Amp Meter) U.S. Patent: 6,557,510 S&S Cycle Date Code (?): 0549. This looks like a typical date code, and if true these were made in the 49 th  week of 2005. My 2007 Texas Chopper was built in August 2006. Symptoms – With engine running, press a finger against the silicone rubber dome covering the release. You should not feel it moving up and down as the engine idles. It should only open (move downwards) on cranking the engine. After it starts, it should no longer be pulsing (moving) up and down – engine vibration yes, pulse no. Verification of Proper Electrical CR Operation – Cut the cable tie holding the CR connector to the engine mount frame vertical tube. Disconnect the connector halves. Connect a volt meter to the harness side connector’s red and black leads. (1) Crank the engine and you should read +12VDC. (2) Stop cranking and the voltage should be zero. If (1) and (2) are true, you have verified the CRs are getting proper voltage, plus you have verified the RHC (for a bike that has an RHC) is operating OK. Material and Tools needed to effect repair – New Compression Release(s) New Silicone Rubber CR Cap(s) Dental floss 30 inch long small wire to use as a fish (to pull CR wires through heat shrink tubing) 1/4 inch ID (or 5/16, although more difficult to use) Black Heat Shrink tubing, 2 feet long needed per EACH release (4 feet total if replacing both CRs). Heat Gun – for heat shrink Blue lock-tite Replacement fuel line – 5/16 inch ID (to make plugs and/or replace fuel line damaged during removal). New crimp-on fuel line clamps – make sure they slip over the existing (and replacement) fuel lines. Fuel line clamp crimper tool (I have one for my outdoor sprinkler irrigation system I got at Home Depot. It worked fine). Cable Ties – 8 inch minimum length; longer preferred. Diagonal Cutters – to clip cable ties. Both 1/4 and 3/8 drive sockets (1/2 inch required – short and maybe deep), 1/4 and 3/8 drive ratchets, extensions (1-1/2 and 3 inch long, 1/4 & 3/8 drive; and 6 inch long 3/8 drive), 3/8 drive universal joint. 5/16 inch hex tip socket (3/8 inch drive). 3/16 inch hex tip socket (1/4 inch drive). 3/16 inch ball tip hex wrench – or - 3/16 inch hex tip wrench – MODIFIED (short end of wrench will need to be cut or ground off such that this end of the wrench can slip into a 3/4 inch high opening and then drop down into a hex head cap screw. 3/16 inch hex tip T-Handle Special CR Socket - S&S two-piece compression release socket which is necessary for rear CR. Electrical tape - to hold washer onto nut when reinstalling gas tank hardware. Flashlight(s) Inspection mirror(s) Digital Optical Inspection Camera (OPTIONAL, but a blessing!!) Camera – MANDATORY! Note Pad and pen/pencil – MANDATORY! 1/4-20 NC Die (and Tap) Small needle nose pliers Small narrow and thin flat blade screwdriver (I have one I had ground down for use with Deutsch connectors) TIP – Take many pictures before, during and after removal. Take from all angles. Take pictures of how lines (tubing/hoses) were routed, which way the fuel line clamps faced, how throttle cables were routed with respect to lines, where connectors were positioned, where cable ties were not only positioned but also how and what they tied down. Repair Stages – There are FOUR MAJOR stages involved to replace both CRs, or even for just the rear CR on a Texas Chopper: 1. Gas tank removal 2. CR removal 3. CR installation 4. Gas tank installation NOTE: Each stage includes a number of steps to be performed. 1. Gas Tank Removal Prep two short approximately 3 inch long lengths of 5/16 inch ID fuel line with one end plugged with a worm gear clamp securing the plug and a similar 1/4 inch piece. Close petcock. Using a fuel line clamp, clamp off the line from petcock to fuel filter. Remove fuel line from filter (probably a worm gear clamp), insert line into a container of sufficient volume to hold the amount of gas in your tank, and drain. Alternatively, if line is not long enough, either extend it into a gas container or remove fuel line at carb from the fuel filter as this may be long enough to reach a container. Drain the tank. Remove filter and line from carb as an assembly, leaving the supply line from petcock to filter still crimp-clamped to the petcock. Protect and remove chrome coil cover (1 screw at top, 2 at bottom). Protect chrome cover and set aside. Cut /twist off the crimp-clamp from the tank’s left side fitting – be prepared to plug this fitting using 1 of the 5/16 inch plugs you prepped. Protect painted gas tank and cut /twist off the crimp-clamp from the tank’s upper most right side fitting – be prepared to plug this fitting using the 1/4 inch plug you prepped. Protect painted gas tank and cut /twist off the crimp-clamp from the tank’s lower right side fitting – be prepared to plug this fitting using the remaining 5/16 inch plug you prepped. TIP – an empty and dry water bottle cut down with scissors to fit under these fittings works well. Pour gas into container. Using a 5/16 inch tip hex socket, 6 inch extension, and 3/8 inch ratchet, unbolt and remove petcock with three attached lines (two tank lines & one filter line) attached. Drain lines and Petcock. Protect the chrome petcock and hardware. In this photo, I have rotated the left hose upwards so you can see how AIH positioned the crimp-on clamp. All three petcock clamps faced away from you, but this positioned the left clamp’s crimp directly in front of the petcock mounting bolt; thus the hose never laid flat and was always rubbing the petcock lever. Later during reinstallation, I opted to position the crimp facing more towards the rear fender in order to allow the hose to lay flat against the bolt once installed. Worked perfectly! Remove the two rear hex nuts and washers from the lower end of tank. You may find both a 3/8 drive and/or 1/4 inch drive needed, along with 3 inch extensions, and both deep and shallow 1/2 inch sockets. TIP - As you engage the nuts for removal, make a mental note of the extension shaft’s angle, both front-to-back as well as side- to-side. Removing the nuts is easy – but aligning them along with the washers for re-installation is a whole different story! Remove the two front hex nuts and washers from the upper end of tank using a 3/8 drive ratchet, 6 inch extension, and a 1/2 inch socket. Protect painted tank for removal – place a towel over the front end of tank as it gets close to frame and handlebars. TIP - Setup foam pads on shop floor (or padding, towels, etc.) to cradle tank upon removal. If you did not plug the three tank fittings, residual fuel will spill. Using two hands, with one reaching under the front of tank and gripping it and the tunnel and other hand at bottom of tank (I found this easier to do standing on left side of bike), tilt up rear of tank then slightly lift up front and slide tank up and downwards and off the backbone. TIP - With the tank off, take photos of how and where all connectors along the backbone are located and their numbering. This is important to note should you ever need to reference the connector numbering on the schematics to where they are physically located on your bike. Also note that each connector pair shares the same number with a different alpha. For example, connector 40B is the wiring harness half of the connector and 40A goes to the devices. The “A” half is always the devices side of the connector while the “B” half is connected to the harness. TIP – While the tank is off you need to do the following to ensure reassembly of the tank hardware is not compromised by cables and tubing. (Reference above 2nd & 5th from left) Note proximity of harness to metal sleeved rubber mount busing. Take the extensions and sockets you used to remove the hardware and place a nut into the sockets. If the nut drops down into the socket, take some aluminum foil (etc) and pack it into the socket such that the nut projects out of the socket about 1/16 inch or so. Place a washer atop the nut (rounded edges facing the nut, flat corners against the mounting. Now take some electrical tape and wrap it around the socket such that the tape just comes up the side edges of the washer. It’s OK if the tape just slightly hangs over the washer in a couple of places. What you are doing is making sure the washer remains with the nut until the nut engages a couple of threads, but you don’t want it such that the socket can’t be removed! Nail polish is not strong enough and super glue may or may not hold well with a metal to metal bond. Now that you have a secure washer and nut, place it into your socket with extension. Hold this underneath each of the tank’s four rubber and metal mounting bushings. What you MUST ensure is that tubing and or wiring tie-wrapped to the backbone does not interfere with the socket, nut AND washer. Once the tank is on it is quite difficult to align the washer and nut to the stud. TIP - If you want to use super glue, as soon after removal of hardware as possible clean with alcohol and dry, super glue, and set aside to harden so you don’t have to wait later on during the reinstall process. TIP – Photograph the two connectors on the engine mount’s vertical piece of frame tubing. Just under the back bone and cable- tied to this piece are two connectors and one of them is the four pin connector for the CRs. (Reference above 4th from left photo). TIP – While the coil cover is off, photograph the two coils, the harness, and write down the harness number; all for future reference if/as needed. 2. Compression Release Removal Rocker Box Cover Removal – Protect the chrome on the two rocker box covers. Note, each rocker box cover consists of two pieces – a short top piece half and a deeper bottom half. Only the top thin half needs to be removed. Protect both top and bottom for each cylinder. MANDATORY – you MUST reference the bolt removal/installation sequences as shown in the Service Manual. Cut necessary tie-wraps to allow moving cables/tubing out of the way. Using a 3/16 inch tip hex socket with a 1/4 inch ratchet and while following the MANDATORY sequence, remove all six hex head cap screws from the front rocker cover; lift up and slide off. Repeat for five of the six hex head cap screws from the rear rocker cover. The rear-most left side hex head cap screw is so close to the frame you will either need to make a tool and/or use a special low-profile hex tip socket wrench. I used one which is no more than 1 inch high (tip and wrench) and that would not clear the frame once the screw gets backed out quite a ways. I took an old right angle 3/16 inch tip hex wrench (“Allen Wrench”) and ground the short end way down to about 3/4 inch tall – this allowed me to back out the screw until it was finger loose. A ball-end hex wrench may also work. TIP – To prevent thread damage to the rocker boxes, once the screws are out run them through the 1/4-20 NC Die to remove previous thread lock. Finish with a wire brush. If needed, chase the rocker threads with the 1/4-20 NC Tap but be careful to seal off/vacuum all bits of removed thread lock. If you do NOT remove previous hardened thread lock, you run the risk of stripping out the threads in the rocker box cover holes. You won’t be able to chase the thread lock in the rear cover’s left side rear-most hole as the frame gets in the way. Deutsch Connector Disassembly – Overview - After unlatching this connector’s halves, you need to disassemble the half connected to the CR wiring. TIP – Sketch, take notes, and photograph how the connector is assembled. Note - The CR connector harness side has two red wires and two black wires; leave this connector intact. A red and black pair feeds a CR. This is important to know when you begin to reassemble the CR connector half. NOTE – The CR connector half has all black wires. The only thing which is important is to ensure each CR’s wires go to a red and black pair. It does NOT matter if a CR black wire connects to a red or black harness side wire as long as the CR connects to one pair. (The CRs have NO polarity) NOTE – the orientation of the orange hard plastic retainer’s tab with respect to the black plastic connector shell’s latch location. The Deutsch connector (wired to the CRs) consists of four pieces: The black wires with crimped-on pins (Below, 3rd from left. Contrasting piece of paper held underneath for clarity), The pliant orange rubber piece with four holes through which the four black insulated wires first pass (Below, 2nd from left photo), The black plastic shell, note it’s mating connector latch location on left edge. (Below, 4th from left) The rigid orange plastic retainer; note orientation with respect to latch on the black connector shell. (Below, left-most) Using a pair of small needle nose pliers, reach into the pin end of the connector and grab hold of the retainer’s orange plastic tab that is sticking up towards you. Pull the orange retainer straight out; not much force is necessary. (Above, left-most photo) TIP – Sketch, take notes, and photograph how the inside of the connector appears. NOTE – make note of the metal pins and how the small cylindrical portion of each individual pin is held in place by a very tiny black tab inside the black connector shell. These tiny tabs latch the pins in the socket so they cannot back out of the shell before or after mating the two connector shell halves. (Above, right-most photo) NOTE – the black tabs are FRAGILE. TIP – you will need a tiny, thin, flat blade screwdriver (or comparable tool) to release the pins from the tabs. For this type connector, I have a small screwdriver I modified; I ground it not only narrow, but thin. Using a (possibly modified) small screwdriver, GENTLY deflect back the tabs to unlatch a pin while at the same time gently pulling the wire and its pin free from the shell. With my modified tool, I use a technique where I insert the tool and in one motion I twist while slightly pushing down on the blade – the twisting moves the pin lock back and the pushing moves the pin below the lock. This reduces strain on the wire and its crimped pin - and prevents damage. TIP - If replacing both CRs - With a pen, mark the orange rubber insert for the two holes used by one of the CR’s pair of wires, and then slip off the orange rubber piece. Each compression release has its own pair of wires sleeved most likely with heat shrink tubing. Then both CRs sleeved wiring is inside yet a third layer of heat shrink. Remove this outer piece to separate each CR and its wiring. Compression Release Extraction – Overview - Each compression release must be loosened, removed, and its heat shrunk wiring pulled free. TIP – Using compressed air, blow out debris surrounding the CR BEFORE you remove it. TIP - Prep the S&S special 2-piece socket. Since this socket’s bottom half becomes quite recessed, during CR installation  (only) socket removal will be difficult once the new CR has been installed. To make extraction easy, I wrapped two doubled-up individual lengths (for both strength and redundancy) of high strength dental floss inside the groove in the socket’s outer wall. Remove the silicone rubber cap. If stuck grab it and rotate, rock it etc. as it gets stuck to the sides of the CR. There are no molded “lips” on the cap so if it feels “trapped”, it isn’t - it is just stuck on. If still stuck, pull it. If a hole gets torn, slip a feeler gauge, (narrow/thin screwdriver, etc) between cap and CR to break free the cap. TIP – To make it easy to route the new wires during new CR release installation, attach a length of scrap wire to the old CR’s wiring. As you extract the old wiring, you are inserting a length of wire which will later be used to pull through the new wiring. Pull the old wiring (attached to the “pull wire”) up and out of the rocker box while leaving the pull wire in place. Detach the pull wire and leave it in place. TIP – Using compressed air, blow out debris surrounding the CR BEFORE you remove it. Pass the old CR wiring up through the bottom half of the S&S socket and lower it down onto the CR. NOTE - Dental floss (or a safety wire) is not needed during CR removal as the CR will extract the lower S&S socket half. (It is necessary only during CR installation.) Now pass the old CR wiring into and out through the side slot in the top half of the S&S socket. Lower the top half and rotate to engage the lower half. Using a 1-1/2 inch extension, and 3/8 inch ratchet, remove the rear Compression release. A 3/8 inch universal was helpful. Repeat for the front CR, using a 6 inch extension. 3. Compression Release Installation Overview - The CR wiring must be sleeved; CR installed with its “crush washer”, tightened and torqued to spec; and wires routed. I tried to heat shrink the wiring before CR installation but found the gap between rocker box and CR to be so narrow that I just couldn’t seem to get the wires to slip down alongside the CR and make the turn to exit the rocker box. I removed the heat shrink and found it far easier to route the wiring without heat shrink – be sure to keep the two wires parallel without crossing the wires as this allows for both easier routing and eventual sleeving. After routing, I was able to push the heat shrink onto the wiring, into the rocker box, up to the CR and then heat shrink the tubing. I pulled the wires well out of the rocker box so I could get the heat gun to properly shrink the tubing along it’s length, and then pulled the wires down and dressed them making sure they were well clear of the CR solenoid plunger’s spring and cir-clip. Keep the wiring tight to the CR sidewall to make it easier to slip over the silicone cap. (Above; 5th & 6th from left) BTW – the S&S supplied sleeving in the kit was too bulky, hence the use of heat shrink tubing. Installation – Apply anti-seize compound to the CR threads. Insert and finger tighten the CR. Attach the safety dental floss or wire to the bottom half of the S&S socket. Slip the bottom half of the S&S socket over the CR wiring and dental floss/safety wire (in my case four strands of dental floss) and lower it down onto the CR. Pass the CR wiring into and out through the side slot in the top half of the S&S socket. Lower the top half, rotate to engage the lower half and tighten; allow wiring to rotate as you turn the socket to prevent it from wrapping around the CR. Torque to S&S spec as noted on their instruction sheet. (Refer to Overview) Pull out the wiring using the “pull wire”. (Above; left-most) Slip over the heat shrink tubing and push it all the way to the CR. (Above; 2nd, 3rd, 4th from left) Shrink the tubing. (Above; 3rd & 4th from left - left wiring not shrunk, right wiring shrunk) Dress the wiring at the CR. (Above; 5th from left) (Refer to Deutsch Connector Disassembly) Reattach the pins to the Deutsch Connector and reassemble the connector. Mate the connector halves. Secure the connector to the frame with a cable tie. Follow the S&S directions for installing the Silicone Cap; install both caps.  (Above; 6th from left) (Refer to Rocker Box Cover Removal) Clean the cover’s gasket channels and clean the gasket. Install gasket to cover. Install the cover. Ensure hardware and all threads are free of old thread lock. Apply thread lock per AIH Service manual, insert cap screws, and tighten. Do NOT over tighten! MANDATORY – you MUST reference the bolt removal/installation sequences as shown in the Service Manual. NOTE - At this point, you may want to briefly hit the starter button to verify the CRs are working properly. You can do this earlier on, but it may get messy without the rocker covers in place. 4. Gas Tank Installation Secure all wiring, tubing and connectors to frame with cable ties. NOTE – Ensure no wiring or tubing, etc. will interfere with gas tank hardware reattachment. Do a dry run test by placing the gas tank mounting flat washer on the socket you will use and make sure there is adequate clearance. If not, reposition the offending wiring, etc. and secure with cable ties. As supplied by the AIH factory, one wire bundle prevented hardware alignment and I had to remove the tank (again) to reposition the wiring. The optical inspection tool not only helped me see this, but was invaluable in easily aligning the hardware to the tank’s studs. (Refer to Gas Tank Removal) Reverse the removal process. Slip on replacement fuel line clamps and crimp as you go. NOTE – Now is the time to replace damaged fuel line, re-route messy/crossed-over fuel lines, etc. Make sure your throttle cables are properly routed during gas tank installation and fuel line reattachment. Reattach the petcock at the appropriate point in the reinstallation process. Reattach the coil cover. Reattach the fuel filter, lines, and clamps. Add a little gas to the tank, and fire it up!
by “MC7”
Compression Release (“CR”) Replacement
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ORGANIZATION ORGANIZATION OWNERS OWNERS For All American Ironhorse Motorcycle Owners
Compression Release Repair
© 2012-2017   American IronHorse Owners Organization Use of AIH Logo Licensed by American Ironhorse, LLC 
Compression Release (“CR”) Replacement
by “MC7”
This is a very detailed report designed to help the individual who thinks they can’t do this, or is a bit nervous about tackling a job like this. It can be done by you provided you take a lot of photos, make a lot of notes, and sketch things for clarification. Between this document and your personal documentation – YOU CAN DO THIS !! Compression Release Data from the REMOVED Compression Releases – Deltrol Controls 57261-61 MED 16X2 PULSE 12 VDC 51 Watts (3.4 Amps draw as MEASURED using a bench power supply set to 12.6VDC and a Digital Volt/Amp Meter) U.S. Patent: 6,557,510 S&S Cycle Date Code (?): 0549. This looks like a typical date code, and if true these were made in the 49 th  week of 2005. My 2007 Texas Chopper was built in August 2006. Symptoms – With engine running, press a finger against the silicone rubber dome covering the release. You should not feel it moving up and down as the engine idles. It should only open (move downwards) on cranking the engine. After it starts, it should no longer be pulsing (moving) up and down – engine vibration yes, pulse no. Verification of Proper Electrical CR Operation – Cut the cable tie holding the CR connector to the engine mount frame vertical tube. Disconnect the connector halves. Connect a volt meter to the harness side connector’s red and black leads. (1) Crank the engine and you should read +12VDC. (2) Stop cranking and the voltage should be zero. If (1) and (2) are true, you have verified the CRs are getting proper voltage, plus you have verified the RHC (for a bike that has an RHC) is operating OK. Material and Tools needed to effect repair – New Compression Release(s) New Silicone Rubber CR Cap(s) Dental floss 30 inch long small wire to use as a fish (to pull CR wires through heat shrink tubing) 1/4 inch ID (or 5/16, although more difficult to use) Black Heat Shrink tubing, 2 feet long needed per EACH release (4 feet total if replacing both CRs). Heat Gun – for heat shrink Blue lock-tite Replacement fuel line – 5/16 inch ID (to make plugs and/or replace fuel line damaged during removal). New crimp-on fuel line clamps – make sure they slip over the existing (and replacement) fuel lines. Fuel line clamp crimper tool (I have one for my outdoor sprinkler irrigation system I got at Home Depot. It worked fine). Cable Ties – 8 inch minimum length; longer preferred. Diagonal Cutters – to clip cable ties. Both 1/4 and 3/8 drive sockets (1/2 inch required – short and maybe deep), 1/4 and 3/8 drive ratchets, extensions (1-1/2 and 3 inch long, 1/4 & 3/8 drive; and 6 inch long 3/8 drive), 3/8 drive universal joint. 5/16 inch hex tip socket (3/8 inch drive). 3/16 inch hex tip socket (1/4 inch drive). 3/16 inch ball tip hex wrench – or - 3/16 inch hex tip wrench – MODIFIED (short end of wrench will need to be cut or ground off such that this end of the wrench can slip into a 3/4 inch high opening and then drop down into a hex head cap screw. 3/16 inch hex tip T-Handle Special CR Socket - S&S two-piece compression release socket which is necessary for rear CR. Electrical tape - to hold washer onto nut when reinstalling gas tank hardware. Flashlight(s) Inspection mirror(s) Digital Optical Inspection Camera (OPTIONAL, but a blessing!!) Camera – MANDATORY! Note Pad and pen/pencil – MANDATORY! 1/4-20 NC Die (and Tap) Small needle nose pliers Small narrow and thin flat blade screwdriver (I have one I had ground down for use with Deutsch connectors) TIP – Take many pictures before, during and after removal. Take from all angles. Take pictures of how lines (tubing/hoses) were routed, which way the fuel line clamps faced, how throttle cables were routed with respect to lines, where connectors were positioned, where cable ties were not only positioned but also how and what they tied down. Repair Stages – There are FOUR MAJOR stages involved to replace both CRs, or even for just the rear CR on a Texas Chopper: 1. Gas tank removal 2. CR removal 3. CR installation 4. Gas tank installation NOTE: Each stage includes a number of steps to be performed. 1. Gas Tank Removal Prep two short approximately 3 inch long lengths of 5/16 inch ID fuel line with one end plugged with a worm gear clamp securing the plug and a similar 1/4 inch piece. Close petcock. Using a fuel line clamp, clamp off the line from petcock to fuel filter. Remove fuel line from filter (probably a worm gear clamp), insert line into a container of sufficient volume to hold the amount of gas in your tank, and drain. Alternatively, if line is not long enough, either extend it into a gas container or remove fuel line at carb from the fuel filter as this may be long enough to reach a container. Drain the tank. Remove filter and line from carb as an assembly, leaving the supply line from petcock to filter still crimp-clamped to the petcock. Protect and remove chrome coil cover (1 screw at top, 2 at bottom). Protect chrome cover and set aside. Cut / twist off the crimp-clamp from the tank’s left side fitting – be prepared to plug this fitting using 1 of the 5/16 inch plugs you prepped. Protect painted gas tank and cut /twist off the crimp-clamp from the tank’s upper most right side fitting – be prepared to plug this fitting using the 1/4 inch plug you prepped. Protect painted gas tank and cut /twist off the crimp-clamp from the tank’s lower right side fitting – be prepared to plug this fitting using the remaining 5/16 inch plug you prepped. TIP – an empty and dry water bottle cut down with scissors to fit under these fittings works well. Pour gas into container. Using a 5/16 inch tip hex socket, 6 inch extension, and 3/8 inch ratchet, unbolt and remove petcock with three attached lines (two tank lines & one filter line) attached. Drain lines and Petcock. Protect the chrome petcock and hardware. In this photo, I have rotated the left hose upwards so you can see how AIH positioned the crimp-on clamp. All three petcock clamps faced away from you, but this positioned the left clamp’s crimp directly in front of the petcock mounting bolt; thus the hose never laid flat and was always rubbing the petcock lever. Later during reinstallation, I opted to position the crimp facing more towards the rear fender in order to allow the hose to lay flat against the bolt once installed. Worked perfectly! Remove the two rear hex nuts and washers from the lower end of tank. You may find both a 3/8 drive and/or 1/4 inch drive needed, along with 3 inch extensions, and both deep and shallow 1/2 inch sockets. TIP - As you engage the nuts for removal, make a mental note of the extension shaft’s angle, both front-to-back as well as side-to- side. Removing the nuts is easy – but aligning them along with the washers for re-installation is a whole different story! Remove the two front hex nuts and washers from the upper end of tank using a 3/8 drive ratchet, 6 inch extension, and a 1/2 inch socket. Protect painted tank for removal – place a towel over the front end of tank as it gets close to frame and handlebars. TIP - Setup foam pads on shop floor (or padding, towels, etc.) to cradle tank upon removal. If you did not plug the three tank fittings, residual fuel will spill. Using two hands, with one reaching under the front of tank and gripping it and the tunnel and other hand at bottom of tank (I found this easier to do standing on left side of bike), tilt up rear of tank then slightly lift up front and slide tank up and downwards and off the backbone. TIP - With the tank off, take photos of how and where all connectors along the backbone are located and their numbering. This is important to note should you ever need to reference the connector numbering on the schematics to where they are physically located on your bike. Also note that each connector pair shares the same number with a different alpha. For example, connector 40B is the wiring harness half of the connector and 40A goes to the devices. The “A” half is always the devices side of the connector while the “B” half is connected to the harness. TIP – While the tank is off you need to do the following to ensure reassembly of the tank hardware is not compromised by cables and tubing. (Reference above 2nd & 5th from left) Note proximity of harness to metal sleeved rubber mount busing. Take the extensions and sockets you used to remove the hardware and place a nut into the sockets. If the nut drops down into the socket, take some aluminum foil (etc) and pack it into the socket such that the nut projects out of the socket about 1/16 inch or so. Place a washer atop the nut (rounded edges facing the nut, flat corners against the mounting. Now take some electrical tape and wrap it around the socket such that the tape just comes up the side edges of the washer. It’s OK if the tape just slightly hangs over the washer in a couple of places. What you are doing is making sure the washer remains with the nut until the nut engages a couple of threads, but you don’t want it such that the socket can’t be removed! Nail polish is not strong enough and super glue may or may not hold well with a metal to metal bond. Now that you have a secure washer and nut, place it into your socket with extension. Hold this underneath each of the tank’s four rubber and metal mounting bushings. What you MUST ensure is that tubing and or wiring tie-wrapped to the backbone does not interfere with the socket, nut AND washer. Once the tank is on it is quite difficult to align the washer and nut to the stud. TIP - If you want to use super glue, as soon after removal of hardware as possible clean with alcohol and dry, super glue, and set aside to harden so you don’t have to wait later on during the reinstall process. TIP – Photograph the two connectors on the engine mount’s vertical piece of frame tubing. Just under the back bone and cable-tied to this piece are two connectors and one of them is the four pin connector for the CRs. (Reference above 4th from left photo). TIP – While the coil cover is off, photograph the two coils, the harness, and write down the harness number; all for future reference if/as needed. 2. Compression Release Removal Rocker Box Cover Removal – Protect the chrome on the two rocker box covers. Note, each rocker box cover consists of two pieces – a short top piece half and a deeper bottom half. Only the top thin half needs to be removed. Protect both top and bottom for each cylinder. MANDATORY – you MUST reference the bolt removal/installation sequences as shown in the Service Manual. Cut necessary tie-wraps to allow moving cables/tubing out of the way. Using a 3/16 inch tip hex socket with a 1/4 inch ratchet and while following the MANDATORY sequence, remove all six hex head cap screws from the front rocker cover; lift up and slide off. Repeat for five of the six hex head cap screws from the rear rocker cover. The rear-most left side hex head cap screw is so close to the frame you will either need to make a tool and/or use a special low-profile hex tip socket wrench. I used one which is no more than 1 inch high (tip and wrench) and that would not clear the frame once the screw gets backed out quite a ways. I took an old right angle 3/16 inch tip hex wrench (“Allen Wrench”) and ground the short end way down to about 3/4 inch tall – this allowed me to back out the screw until it was finger loose. A ball-end hex wrench may also work. TIP – To prevent thread damage to the rocker boxes, once the screws are out run them through the 1/4-20 NC Die to remove previous thread lock. Finish with a wire brush. If needed, chase the rocker threads with the 1/4-20 NC Tap but be careful to seal off/vacuum all bits of removed thread lock. If you do NOT remove previous hardened thread lock, you run the risk of stripping out the threads in the rocker box cover holes. You won’t be able to chase the thread lock in the rear cover’s left side rear- most hole as the frame gets in the way. Deutsch Connector Disassembly – Overview - After unlatching this connector’s halves, you need to disassemble the half connected to the CR wiring. TIP – Sketch, take notes, and photograph how the connector is assembled. Note - The CR connector harness side has two red wires and two black wires; leave this connector intact. A red and black pair feeds a CR. This is important to know when you begin to reassemble the CR connector half. NOTE – The CR connector half has all black wires. The only thing which is important is to ensure each CR’s wires go to a red and black pair. It does NOT matter if a CR black wire connects to a red or black harness side wire as long as the CR connects to one pair. (The CRs have NO polarity) NOTE – the orientation of the orange hard plastic retainer’s tab with respect to the black plastic connector shell’s latch location. The Deutsch connector (wired to the CRs) consists of four pieces: The black wires with crimped-on pins (Below #3) with a contrasting piece of paper held underneath for clarity. The pliant orange rubber piece with four holes through which the four black insulated wires first pass (Below #2). The black plastic shell, note it’s mating connector latch location on left edge. (Below #4) The rigid orange plastic retainer; note orientation with respect to latch on the black connector shell. (Below #1) Using a pair of small needle nose pliers, reach into the pin end of the connector and grab hold of the retainer’s orange plastic tab that is sticking up towards you. Pull the orange retainer straight out; not much force is necessary. (Above, left-most photo) TIP – Sketch, take notes, and photograph how the inside of the connector appears. NOTE – make note of the metal pins and how the small cylindrical portion of each individual pin is held in place by a very tiny black tab inside the black connector shell. These tiny tabs latch the pins in the socket so they cannot back out of the shell before or after mating the two connector shell halves. (Above, right-most photo) NOTE – the black tabs are FRAGILE. TIP – you will need a tiny, thin, flat blade screwdriver (or comparable tool) to release the pins from the tabs. For this type connector, I have a small screwdriver I modified; I ground it not only narrow, but thin. Using a (possibly modified) small screwdriver, GENTLY deflect back the tabs to unlatch a pin while at the same time gently pulling the wire and its pin free from the shell. With my modified tool, I use a technique where I insert the tool and in one motion I twist while slightly pushing down on the blade – the twisting moves the pin lock back and the pushing moves the pin below the lock. This reduces strain on the wire and its crimped pin - and prevents damage. TIP - If replacing both CRs - With a pen, mark the orange rubber insert for the two holes used by one of the CR’s pair of wires, and then slip off the orange rubber piece. Each compression release has its own pair of wires sleeved most likely with heat shrink tubing. Then both CRs sleeved wiring is inside yet a third layer of heat shrink. Remove this outer piece to separate each CR and its wiring. Compression Release Extraction – Overview - Each compression release must be loosened, removed, and its heat shrunk wiring pulled free. TIP – Using compressed air, blow out debris surrounding the CR BEFORE you remove it. TIP - Prep the S&S special 2-piece socket. Since this socket’s bottom half becomes quite recessed, during CR installation  (only) socket removal will be difficult once the new CR has been installed. To make extraction easy, I wrapped two doubled-up individual lengths (for both strength and redundancy) of high strength dental floss inside the groove in the socket’s outer wall. Remove the silicone rubber cap. If stuck grab it and rotate, rock it etc. as it gets stuck to the sides of the CR. There are no molded “lips” on the cap so if it feels “trapped”, it isn’t - it is just stuck on. If still stuck, pull it. If a hole gets torn, slip a feeler gauge, (narrow/thin screwdriver, etc) between cap and CR to break free the cap. TIP – To make it easy to route the new wires during new CR release installation, attach a length of scrap wire to the old CR’s wiring. As you extract the old wiring, you are inserting a length of wire which will later be used to pull through the new wiring. Pull the old wiring (attached to the “pull wire”) up and out of the rocker box while leaving the pull wire in place. Detach the pull wire and leave it in place. TIP – Using compressed air, blow out debris surrounding the CR BEFORE you remove it. Pass the old CR wiring up through the bottom half of the S&S socket and lower it down onto the CR. NOTE - Dental floss (or a safety wire) is not needed during CR removal as the CR will extract the lower S&S socket half. (It is necessary only during CR installation.) Now pass the old CR wiring into and out through the side slot in the top half of the S&S socket. Lower the top half and rotate to engage the lower half. Using a 1-1/2 inch extension, and 3/8 inch ratchet, remove the rear Compression release. A 3/8 inch universal was helpful. Repeat for the front CR, using a 6 inch extension. 3. Compression Release Installation Overview - The CR wiring must be sleeved; CR installed with its “crush washer”, tightened and torqued to spec; and wires routed. I tried to heat shrink the wiring before CR installation but found the gap between rocker box and CR to be so narrow that I just couldn’t seem to get the wires to slip down alongside the CR and make the turn to exit the rocker box. I removed the heat shrink and found it far easier to route the wiring without heat shrink – be sure to keep the two wires parallel without crossing the wires as this allows for both easier routing and eventual sleeving. After routing, I was able to push the heat shrink onto the wiring (#3), into the rocker box, up to the CR and then heat shrink the tubing. I pulled the wires well out of the rocker box (#4) so I could get the heat gun to properly shrink the tubing along it’s length, and then pulled the wires down and dressed them making sure they were well clear of the CR solenoid plunger’s spring and cir-clip (#5). Keep the wiring tight to the CR sidewall to make it easier to slip over the silicone cap (#6). BTW – the S&S supplied sleeving in the kit was too bulky, hence the use of heat shrink tubing. Installation – Apply anti-seize compound to the CR threads. Insert and finger tighten the CR. Attach the safety dental floss or wire to the bottom half of the S&S socket. Slip the bottom half of the S&S socket over the CR wiring and dental floss/safety wire (in my case four strands of dental floss) and lower it down onto the CR. Pass the CR wiring into and out through the side slot in the top half of the S&S socket. Lower the top half, rotate to engage the lower half and tighten; allow wiring to rotate as you turn the socket to prevent it from wrapping around the CR. Torque to S&S spec as noted on their instruction sheet. (Refer to Overview) Pull out the wiring using the “pull wire”. (Above; left-most) Slip over the heat shrink tubing and push it all the way to the CR. (Above; 2nd, 3rd, 4th from left) Shrink the tubing. (Above; 3rd & 4th from left - left wiring not shrunk, right wiring shrunk) Dress the wiring at the CR. (Above; 5th from left) (Refer to Deutsch Connector Disassembly) Reattach the pins to the Deutsch Connector and reassemble the connector. Mate the connector halves. Secure the connector to the frame with a cable tie. Follow the S&S directions for installing the Silicone Cap; install both caps.  (Above; 6th from left) (Refer to Rocker Box Cover Removal) Clean the cover’s gasket channels and clean the gasket. Install gasket to cover. Install the cover. Ensure hardware and all threads are free of old thread lock. Apply thread lock per AIH Service manual, insert cap screws, and tighten. Do NOT over tighten! MANDATORY – you MUST reference the bolt removal/installation sequences as shown in the Service Manual. NOTE - At this point, you may want to briefly hit the starter button to verify the CRs are working properly. You can do this earlier on, but it may get messy without the rocker covers in place. 4. Gas Tank Installation Secure all wiring, tubing and connectors to frame with cable ties. NOTE – Ensure no wiring or tubing, etc. will interfere with gas tank hardware reattachment. Do a dry run test by placing the gas tank mounting flat washer on the socket you will use and make sure there is adequate clearance. If not, reposition the offending wiring, etc. and secure with cable ties. As supplied by the AIH factory, one wire bundle prevented hardware alignment and I had to remove the tank (again) to reposition the wiring. The optical inspection tool not only helped me see this, but was invaluable in easily aligning the hardware to the tank’s studs. (Refer to Gas Tank Removal) Reverse the removal process. Slip on replacement fuel line clamps and crimp as you go. NOTE – Now is the time to replace damaged fuel line, re-route messy/crossed-over fuel lines, etc. Make sure your throttle cables are properly routed during gas tank installation and fuel line reattachment. Reattach the petcock at the appropriate point in the reinstallation process. Reattach the coil cover. Reattach the fuel filter, lines, and clamps. Add a little gas to the tank, and fire it up!
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Compression Release Repair